2010 – A roadmap for the future

Futurist Richard Watson has updated his annual trends and technology timeline for 2010.  What an interesting conversation starter at a meeting looking at technology!

2010-trendsmapfinal1.png

The map has 16 lines representing everything from society & culture to news & media. There are also 5 time zones representing 2010-2050, so everything that falls outside the central zone (zone 1) is obviously a prediction.

The map is published under a Creative Commons Share-A-Like Licence.

Be sure to look at the full A3 sized image to get the full impact! PDF version available here.

(via 2010 Trends – A Roadmap for the Future)

LazyFeed – lazy and productive

I admit to being a web wanderer – lazy random browsing in the topic areas that interest me is wonderful,  and it’s amazing what new things you find, what you can enjoy, and what you can learn. My RSS reader is  ‘chockers’ – so I can’t just keep adding possible feeds for reading.

Rather belatedly  I’ve also discovered LazyFeed.  Perfect!

If you are more into tracking stories on a particular subject like technology, music etc rather than tracking specific blogs then LazyFeed could be the tool you need. You just need to sign up and add your favourite topic…. via MUO.

I’ve been using it for a few months now, and just love the flexible way of trawling on my favourite  topics. OK, it’s not going to aggregate and store the same way as my RSS reader (Google + Feedly) but it’s going to keep sifting and providing an online reading experience for me any day that I want to drop by!

According to the founder, LazyFeed is like instant messenger for your topics. It’s a tech tool that suits the slow adopters of technology! Got some nice enhancements in January too!

Another recommendation came my way via @RadHertz.

NewsCred lets you launch an online newspaper in minutes. Cool!  Read more about this from Louis Gray.

Here’s an example from UQ Innovation Times.  Nice :-).

Local Books iPhone application!

Local Books is a new iPhone App which should be of interest to all book lovers. It’s powered by LibraryThing Local, the LibraryThing member-created database of 51,000 bookstores and libraries around the world.

Local Books is our contribution to keeping the book world interesting. Amazon and other online retailers are great. LibraryThing is great too. But book lovers can’t be happy in a world with fewer and fewer physical bookstores, and a rising threat to libraries. The more we know about this physical book world, the better we can foster it, and the better we can use websites like LibraryThing and Amazon to improve our world, not replace it.

This application is unique – as it draws on the power of a socially-connected and created resources. We have the chance to increase the value of the App too.

I’ve downloaded it – tested – and it works a treat!!

More details from the LibraryThing Blog:

How You Can Help. Even with 51,000 venues, not every bookstore and library is in LibraryThing. If you know of one that’s not in there, go ahead and add it. If you represent the bookstore or library in question, you can “claim” your venue page, and start using LibraryThing to connect to your customers or patrons. Even if they’re all there, most are still missing something—a photograph, a phone number, a good description, a Twitter handle. Events—especially indie bookstores and libraries—are a particular need. It’s a virtuous cycle. The better we can make the data, the more people will find the application useful, and the more people who will make it better

Features include:

  • Search for venues (bookstores and libraries) as well as events near your current location using the iPhone’s built-in location features.
  • Search for venues and events at any location or by name.
  • Venues can be sorted by distance, name, or type.
  • Venues are color coded, following the maps on LibraryThing Local (colors correspond to the colors used on maps in LibraryThing Local).
  • Each venue has a detail page with a map. Tap it to jump to the iPhone Maps application.
  • Venues often sport a description, clickable website and phone number links, events, and a photo.
  • You can favorite locations and events, and there’s a “Favorites” list where you can find them.(1)

Check it out on iTunes.

Spotted in the BookBench at the NewYorker and  promoted on  Twitter  by @librarythingtim - of course :-)

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Get your horizons boxed in!

Ever collected boxed sets of your favourite authors, movies and the like ~ to keep and remember?

I’m predicting that 2010 will be a year of amazing shifts, consolidating the innovations that Web 2.0 introduced. Educators always like to study how, what, where, when and why…so go on over now and collect your boxed sets of the Horizon Project Reports put out since 2004 by NMC.

Your  own ‘boxed set’ of Horizon Reports as a single pf:
http://www.nmc.org/pdf/horizon-reports-set.pdf (2.5 Mb PDF)

Collectors Edition which also includes the 2008 and 2009 Australia-New Zealand Editions, the 2009 K12 Edition, and the 2009 Economic Development Edition!
http://www.nmc.org/pdf/horizon-reports-all.pdf (4.6 Mb PDF)

Look for the news on January 19, 2010 when they will add to both collections, the newest edition– the 2010 Horizon Report– which will be released at the EDUCAUSE ELI Annual Conference in Austin, Texas.

Grab the Wordle for the reports too if you like!

Wordle: Horizon Reports 2004-2009

What Matters Now

Seth Godin writes about marketing, the spread of ideas and managing both customers and employees with respect. If you’re not familiar with his books, check them out here.

Seth’s newest ebook What Matters Now is a compilation (or is it a collaboration) of ideas and actions happening around the world.

Seth explains:

We want to shake things up. More than seventy extraordinary authors and thinkers contributed to this ebook. It’s designed to make you sit up and think, to change your new year’s resolutions, to foster some difficult conversations with your team.

Over 70 authors pitched in, and it’s now free to download here, or on Scribd.  Some great ideas to grab for education too!

Did you know that last year 1.2 million books were loaned out in developing countries through Room to Read?

Take one of the pages, and use it as a discussion starter with your students, or your next faculty meeting.